Saturday Single No. 105

Originally posted December 20, 2008

I believe I mentioned last year about this time that I don’t do a lot of Christmas music. I used to, and I’ve still got a fair number of Christmas LPs. Some I bought myself over the years, generally at garage sales. And some I got from my dad. When I was a kid, Dad would head out every December and get the annual holiday LPs that Goodyear and Firestone issued. When Dad’s records came to me, I got those, too.

But I don’t play them. I really can’t say why. I just don’t.

Maybe I’ve been over-holidayed over the years. The local oldies station, for several years now, has played Christmas music twenty-fours a day from Thanksgiving through New Year’s. That, I’ve long thought, is a bit much. And this autumn, I heard a Christmas carol – I’ve forgotten which one – used as background for a television commercial on November 1. Way, way too early.

It’s not like the Texas Gal and I are Scrooge and Scroogette. Over the years, we’ve shared celebrations with our families both in Minnesota and in Texas. We gather with friends during the busy time of December, trying in our small ways to create the spirit of peace called for by the season. We share gifts – both spiritual and tangible – with each other and our families. But sometimes it seems that the sheer mass of holiday busyness outside our doors overwhelms us, and we retreat from the madness when we are home.

So we don’t play a lot of holiday music at home, and I don’t post a lot of it here.

With that said, there are two Christmas records I still do love enough to post here, one today and the other next Thursday. I have no doubt that other blogs will also post them this season, but that’s okay. The more often these two songs are heard, the better.

The first is a single pulled from the 1963 album A Christmas Gift For You From Phil Spector. Here’s the Wall of Sound behind Darlene Love on “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home),” today’s Saturday Single.

Darlene Love – “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)” [Philles 4005, 1963]

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: